Hungary’s State Secretary for Security Policy Visits OPCW

6 November 2018
State Secretary for Security Policy of the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, H.E. Mr Péter Sztáray, and the Director-General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), H.E. Mr Fernando Arias

State Secretary for Security Policy of the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, H.E. Mr Péter Sztáray, and the Director-General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), H.E. Mr Fernando Arias

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — 6 November 2018 — The Director-General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), H.E. Mr Fernando Arias, and the State Secretary for Security Policy of the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, H.E. Mr Péter Sztáray, met yesterday at the OPCW Headquarters in The Hague.

The Director-General and the State Secretary discussed the implementation of the decision addressing the threat from chemical weapons use adopted by the Member States of the OPCW during the Fourth Special Session of the Conference of States Parties in June. The Director-General underlined the Organisation’s priorities to enhance capabilities to prevent the re-emergence of chemical weapons, and outlined the plan to upgrade the OPCW laboratory capabilities through the construction of a new Centre for Chemistry and Technology.

The Director-General outlined anticipated challenges and outcomes of the upcoming Fourth Review Conference in terms of establishing the strategic priorities of the Organisation for the next five years.

The Director-General remarked, “To counter the shadow cast by chemical weapons, a strong, consensus-based approach grounded in the Convention’s norms is required. I thank Hungary for its support to the Organisation, and its tireless work to strengthen the global ban on chemical weapons”.

The State Secretary for Security Policy underscored that the Chemical Weapons Convention is a key component of the non-proliferation and disarmament framework and an effective tool to combat the use of chemical weapons. He reiterated that Hungary continues to be a strong supporter of the OPCW’s role and work.

He stated, “We consider the recent decision of the Special Conference of CWC States Parties to enhance the OPCW’s capacity to identify the perpetrators of chemical weapons attacks as a crucial step forward. We look forward to the implementation of the new arrangements. 

We do hope that during the Conference of the CWC States Parties in November we can also reach a common understanding concerning the financial aspects of implementing the decision of the Special Session of the Conference of States Parties.”

Background

Hungary joined the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1997.

As the implementing body for the Chemical Weapons Convention, the OPCW, with its 193 Member States, oversees the global endeavour to permanently eliminate chemical weapons. Since the Convention’s entry into force in 1997, it is the most successful disarmament treaty eliminating an entire class of weapons of mass destruction. 

Over 96% of all chemical weapon stockpiles declared by possessor States have been destroyed under OPCW verification. For its extensive efforts in eliminating chemical weapons, the OPCW received the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize.

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